Archive for Tree Care

A Northeast Ohio Gem – Check Out the Fall Colors at the Hachs-Otis Nature Preserve

Hachs-Otis - Overlook 2017-10-17.03

Almost every autumn, I make the short trek out to Willoughby Hills to visit the little-known Hachs-Otis Nature Preserve and take the short loop trail out to a spectacular view of the Chagrin River valley. In the fall, when northeast Ohio’s trees are in their full glory, the steep shale cliffs and brilliant forests provide contrast to the rushing river and cracking canyon walls of Hach Otis State Preserve.

Along the short boardwalk and trail that leads out to the overlook, you’ll pass some spectacular trees. Then, before you know it, you find yourself at the clifftop opening where your eyes are treated to a wide panoramic view of the trees & river before you. Don’t forget to bring your binoculars and to take plenty of photos!

How to Get There: Hachs-Otis Nature Preserve is located at the end of Skyline Drive, a short dead-end street off of River Rd (Rt 174), just north of Chardon Rd (Rt 6). If one takes I-90 to the Rt 91 (SOM Center Rd) exit (1st exit on I-90 East after the I-271 merge). Take Rt 91 south to Rt 6, turn left and drive east to River Rd (Rt 174). Skyline Drive will be the very first street on your left. Drive down to its ending at the Hachs-Otis Nature Preserver parking area.

Click Here for a Brief Hachs-Otis Video

The preserve is managed by the Ohio Department of Natural Resources (ODNR), Division of Natural Areas and Preserves. Click Here to Check Out the Hachs-Otis webpage.

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Fight Emerald Ash Borer

Julie Washington - Plain Dealer 060115.01By Julie Washington, The Plain Dealer
On June 01, 2015

FIGHT EMERALD ASH BORER: Early detection is key to fighting the emerald ash borer (EAB), a destructive tree insect. Arborjet, a company dedicated to developing remedies for saving ash trees, offers tips on how to spot the emerald ash borer. Look for:

  • Canopy dieback – Beginning in the top 1/3 of the tree, leaves stop growing to the tips of the branches and progresses until tree is bare.
  •  Shoots from the roots – Sprouts grow from the roots and trunk, and leaves often appear larger than normal.
  • Splits in bark — Vertical fissures appear on bark.
  • A tree expert points out the markings left from emerald ash borer larvae on an ash tree. The invasive pest has killed tens of millions of ash trees in the United States and Canada.

    The markings (feeding galleries) left from emerald ash borer larvae on an ash tree. The invasive pest has killed tens of millions of ash trees in the United States and Canada.

    Grooves and D-shaped exit holes – Feeding galleries, or grooves, for larvae weave back and forth under the bark. Adults form D-shaped holes when they emerge from under the bark.

  • The markings (larval feeding galleries) left from emerald ash borer larvae on an ash tree. The invasive pest has killed tens of millions of ash trees in the United States and Canada.
  • Increased woodpecker damage – These birds peck at outer bark while foraging, and create large holes while extracting insects.
  • Here’s more information about emerald ash borer.

We can now fight back! There is a product, TREE-age, by Arborjet, that we can inject every other year that has shown over 90% control of the larvae that kill the tree. The injection is best done as a preventative, but we have had some success in trees with limited infestations.

ARBORjet.02The trees are dosed in milliliters. For example, a 12″ diameter ash requires just over 40 milliliters of TREE-age and costs about $150 + tax, every other year.  Not a whole lot of money to protect a prominent ash tree in your landscape.

If you have any ash trees that are currently not under our care, please contact us for a no-cost or obligation inspection to provide our recommendations. We might be able to protect your valuable ash tree, allowing you to enjoy its benefits for many years to come. And, if you have any neighbors or friends with ash trees, we always appreciate a referral. Call us at 440-4521-9589 or email info@forestcitytree.com.

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5 of the World’s Most Amazing Trees

When I saw this neat post (click link below), I realized I had actually seen all five species of trees in various parts of the world.

5 of the World’s Most Amazing Trees

Rainbow Eucalyptus tree along the Hana Highway on the island of Maui.

Rainbow Eucalyptus tree along the Hana Highway on the island of Maui.

One of the many species of banyan trees found in Singapore, the Ficus stricta, commonly referred to as a "strangler fig."

One of the many species of banyan trees found in Singapore, the Ficus stricta, commonly referred to as a “strangler fig.”
Bristlecone pines on the Mt Evans Scenic highway in the Colorado Rockies.

Bristlecone pines on the Mt Evans Scenic highway in the Colorado Rockies.

Baobob Tree by Victoria Falls in Zimbabwe.

Baobob Tree by Victoria Falls in Zimbabwe.

Redwood trees in John Muir Woods, north of San Francisco, CA.

Redwood trees in John Muir Woods, north of San Francisco, CA.

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Massive Sculptue of the Last Standing Tree from 2011 Tsunami

Massive Sculptue of the Last Standing Tree from 2011 Tsunami

By Christopher on March 11, 2013

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As cleanup continues two years after the deadly tsunami that struck Japan, a decision was made to preserve the memory of the miracle pine tree. The towering 88-foot tall pine tree was the last standing among a forest of 70,000 trees that were completely wiped out along the coast in Rikuzentakata, Iwate prefecture. The tree survived for nearly 18 months after the tsunami but eventually died due to high levels of saline introduced into its environment, after which is was felled and giant molds were created to again form the trunk and branches as they stood when the tree was alive. The monument is set to be unveiled this week.

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© 2010-2013 Christopher Jobson

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Arbor Alert! This Tree is Missing.

Arbor Alert banner hanging on the fence in front of the Kan Zaman Restaurant, at 1616 West 25th.

Somebody is not happy about the removal of the tree that had been growing in a sidewalk cutout.

This banner caught my attention as I drove home from my Thursday weekly meeting of the Rotary Club of Cleveland.  Heading south on W. 25th St. from Detroit Ave toward Lorain Ave, I saw this banner hung on the fence in front of the Kan Zaman Middle Eastern Restaurant & Bakery.

Of course, I HAD to get a picture of it, so I quickly turned around and went pack to the Kan Zaman parking lot.  There, in front of the banner, was a section of new concrete, where clearly the tree pictured on the banner had once been.

And, there, looming large above the north end of the parking lot, stood the large billboard for Cleveland’s Country Music Station, WGAR 99.5.  Score one for the billboard industry!

The reason why the “missing tree” was removed – to accommodate an unobscured view of this beautiful billboard.

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2011 Tree Photo Competition

 

 

 

 

Lonely Tree by Wah Ling Lin (Hong-Kong)

 Beautiful photos of amazing trees and tree work from the 2011 Treephoto Competition sponsored by the Australian company IntoTrees and mt.arborist.

Check out all the photos here:  mt.arborist – resultat

 

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Enjoy the Concert Insects Perform in Your Own Yard

Lisa Rainsong, and her research with the music of insects, was featured in a wonderful article by Julie Washington in the Cleveland Plain Dealer, Thursday August 25, 2011. Lisa Rainsong is a client of the Forest City Tree Protection Co. Congratulations, Lisa!

If you want to learn more about the insect ensemble making music in your backyard, check out the Songs of Insects website at:
musicofnature.org/songsofinsects.

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